Tag Archives: hammock

4 Reasons Hammocks Are Good For You.

Refresh Rainbow Family Hammock

Also good for someone else.. so it makes a brilliant gift every single time.

Spending some time in a hammock can offer you access to a peaceful retreat from the world. Being suspended above the grass, beach, or another landscape with the wind blowing gently is one of the best experiences in the world.

There are several benefits to consider if you’re thinking about owning a hammock. Here is what you can expect.

#1. You fall asleep faster.

Hammocks place you into the perfect body position for sleep. That encourages your body to relax faster, allowing you to enter into a state of rest quickly. This process engages with even more speed if there is a gentle rocking motion included.

#2. You can optimise your rest.

There is less tossing and turning when you rest in a hammock. The design places your head at a natural elevation of about 10% (or more), allowing your body to find a comfort zone to encourage relaxation.

#3. You receive a deeper, better rest.

Not only can you find rest faster when you take a nap in a hammock, but it will also help you to sleep deeper and longer. This benefit encourages memory improvements, a balanced mood, and an increase in your mental performance.

#4. You can perform restful activities in a hammock.

Reading in a hammock is a favourite activity because you can quickly find a comfortable position to enjoy a great book. You can read outside, in the sunshine, without needing any pillows.

You could sleep each night in a hammock if you find one that is comfortable. It may help with insomnia, encourage better sleep, and help you get through your day faster. Why not try one today?

You can read more from the Hammock Heaven Blog by clicking here! Click here to see our full range of Hammocks and Hanging Chairs by clicking here

4 Festival Essentials for 2020

One of the many things the UK, Sweden, Czechia, Germany and many other places do well is putting on a great festival.

Each summer swarms of revellers head towards a festival or multiple in aid of an escape from reality and a chance to enjoy fantastic music, time with friends and the ultimate down time.

Whether you’re visiting a huge festival such a Leeds, Glastonbury or Download or a smaller one the they all have something in common and that’s the camping. With it being a festival, first things we’d recommend not taking anything valuable as it may get lost or stolen. Bring back the Nokia brick and grab your wellies as here are our top 4 must haves for any festival.

Hammocks

Your own food:

We would advise to take a lot of tinned food like beans and maybe a pot noodle or two, as the food can be expensive. We’d advise taking as much low weight food as possible as it can get heavy. Snacks such as crisps, cereal bars and fruit are ideal.

Your own hammock:

Not all hammocks need to be hung up, we have a great range of hammocks which are ideal for festivals as you can pitch them up wherever you go, not only does it save you sleeping on the hard ground it can help with things such as not getting cold and should give you a decent night’s sleep (read more here). There is not much worse than trying to enjoy yourself when you’re tired.

Denim Hammock

 

Sun cream:  

Although it may not seem important within the list of essentials such as food and clothes, sun cream is super important at festivals. Whether it’s hot or not, spending hours in the sun can be damaging for your skin and can give you bad sunburn. Carry it around in an easy to apply travel size bottle and fill it up each day before you head out and it saves you from needing to carry around a full bottle of sun cream.

A first aid kit: 

Is it really a festival if someone doesn’t injure themselves in some way or another? From cuts and blisters to bites. Buying or putting together a small first aid kit can be crucial in your time of need. Plus, your friends will probably thank you for it later when they need something from it. You can buy one of these online or pretty much every shop on the High Street. 

We hope you’ve found our tips of what to take to a festival helpful and if you’re going to a festival this year we hope you have a great time.

Bitcoin

Well, how are you going to pay for stuff, if all that fiat currency in the bank has been inflated away to zero. Bitcoin never gets inflated away.

You can read more from the Hammock Heaven Blog by clicking here! Click here to see our full range of Hammocks and Hanging Chairs by clicking here

Hammocks? Is It Normal ?

Raya Family Hammock - Sunset

The Ropes on My Hammock are Fraying: Is That Normal?

Whether you own a full rope hammock, or you’re concerned about the strands that connect the body of your product to its connection point, there will come a time when the ends seem to start fraying.

Many hammock owners become concerned at this stage because its This process is called tasseling. In most cases, it is harmless to the hammock. It does not impact the durability of the rope. Seems like the product is beginning to unravel.

Refresh - Family Hammock - Cocktail
Looks Normal , but is it ?

Why Does Tasseling Occur with a Hammock?

Tasseling is a different process than fraying when dealing with the durability of the rope in your hammock. If the rope begins to fray, then you will have multiple strands start to loosen and unwind. This process will eventually impact the integrity of that rope strand, which could reduce the maximum weight capacity of your hammock should it occur.

Tasseling occurs when individual strands of the rope, either natural or synthetic, begin to look like they break loose from their attachment point. During the manufacturing process, it is not unusual for hammock makers to dip the rope components in wax or seal the ends with heat to improve the creation process.

That’s why you will see fraying occur in the middle of the rope, whereas tasseling typically appears along the knots. If tasseling causes the knot to begin unwinding, then you should stop using the hammock immediately to have it repaired. Otherwise, you can continue to enjoy the comfort and convenience of your hammock!

You can read more from the Hammock Heaven Blog by clicking here! Click here to see our full range of Hammocks and Hanging Chairs by clicking here

How To Look After A Hammock

Mammoth XXL Family Hammock - Azureus

How Do I Keep My Hammock Looking New?

If you have purchased a colourful hammock for your home, then fading is an issue that you will want to confront immediately. Your approach depends on the materials that were used to create the hammock in the first place.

If you have a cotton or canvas hammock, then rinse it with mild, soapy water before washing it down with your garden hose. Then lay it flat or hang it to dry before using again. Keep the spreader bars out of the water whenever possible.

When you own a polyester hammock, then the same rules apply. If your material is white, then you can sometimes use a 1:4 bleach/water solution to clean it if you need intensive results. A soft-bristled brush is often useful too.

mammoth xxl hammock - hamaca hammocks from Hammock Heaven
mammoth xxl hammock – hamaca hammocks from Hammock Heaven

If you have a synthetic-based hammock at home, then use warm, soapy water and then rub the material against itself instead of using a brush. For hammocks that are made with quilted fabrics, spot cleaning is the best approach to take. Any fill that the product contains can bunch up when exposed to moisture for an extended time, which can then make it challenging to have the product return to its usual shape.

Some hammocks feature a quick-dry fabric that promotes breathability. Use the same approach with this material as you would with polyester. As a best practice with your hammock, make sure that leaves, twigs, and other debris doesn’t accumulate in your yard. The wind can blow these items into it, which will reduce its lifespan over time. Then keep your materials out of direct sunlight to prevent premature fading.

You can read more from the Hammock Heaven Blog by clicking here! Click here to see our full range of Hammocks and Hanging Chairs by clicking here

Guide To Measuring Hammocks

mammoth xxl hammock - hamaca hammocks from Hammock Heaven

How Do You Measure a Hammock? What size do I need? Hammock Heaven has put together this helpful guide on measuring hammocks so you can take the guess work out of it!

How Do You Measure a Hammock?

If you want to select the perfect hammock for your home or property today, then knowing how to measure this product will help you find the correct solution.

Length is the primary measurement that you will want to review as you shop for your new hammock. Most will need a space that is two feet longer than the area you intend to use the item for proper hanging.

That means if your space is 450cm, then your hammock can be 400cm feet in length. You would take this measurement from ring-to-ring on the product.

This measurement applies most often when you are also purchasing a stand for your hammock to use outside in your yard. If you have two trees that you plan to use, then measure the distance between them. Take that figure, then choose a hammock that fits in that space comfortably.

Mammoth Family Hammock - Colora - Xlarge (Seconds)
Cadejos on the Mammoth Hammock

Weight Capacity Is Another Important Measurement

Don’t forget to look at the weight capacity of your preferred hammocks before completing a purchase. Some models can hold 200kg when correctly installed. There are also some that struggle to carry a 80kg person.

Think about what your needs will be for the hammock, then review the product specifications online to determine if it will meet them.

If you purchase a hammock stand, the weight capacity will be a measurement to consider with that product as well.

A quick flick through some of our hammocks, with information about how to hang a hammock narrated over the top

When you have a hammock that works well for your space, then you will have an enjoyable experience with it. Consider these measurements first, and then you can find an amazing product to enjoy.

You can read more from the Hammock Heaven Blog by clicking here! Click here to see our full range of Hammocks and Hanging Chairs by clicking here

What Are Some Good Materials To Make A Hammock ?

Knit Hanging Chair - White - Medium

The quick answer is that cotton probably feels the nicest, but it is hard to tell the difference with a polyester cotton mix or even pure polyester. The polyester hammocks will last longer and fade less.

hammocks with cadejos
hammocks with cadejos

Differences Between Cotton, Polyester, and Synthetic Hammock Materials

When you start shopping for a hammock, then you will find three primary materials to consider: cotton, polyester, or other synthetics. If you look at a canvas hammock, then this material is usually made from cotton to create a durable layer of protection.

Many synthetics have a brand name associated with them because it is a proprietary product. Tropilex offers a durable poly/cotton blend for many of their hammocks as well. Each material brings something to the user experience.

Cotton Rope Hammock - Double Natural
Cotton Rope Hammock

Cotton: This material provides you with the classic hammock experience. It is soft, comforting, and very durable. You’ll want to store it somewhere dry during the winter or an extended period of poor weather.

Polyester: This material offers more durability for challenging climates. It is resistant to mould, mildew, and common forms of rot. Most hammocks made from this material feel the same as the natural cotton ones.

Synthetics: This material can come in a variety of formats. Some will offer breathability that will keep you cooler during use. Others provide a remarkable amount of durability.

Cost is a significant factor when deciding which material type to choose for your new hammock. Natural materials are often the cheapest. That’s why selecting a poly/cotton blend as you can find with many hammocks is a tempting choice.

You’ll receive a higher level of durability and easier maintenance without breaking your budget. Every material used to make a hammock offers distinct advantages. Think about what your needs are, and then choose the material that will support you well. 

You can read more from the Hammock Heaven Blog by clicking here! Click here to see our full range of Hammocks and Hanging Chairs by clicking here

How To Hang A Hammock. A Guide With 14 Easy Tips. 3 Is The Best.

Hammock Fixing Kit

A 10 minute read

Read The Ultimate Guide To Easily Hang Your Hammock So It Is Secure And Comfortable.

You can listen to Henry(7) and Winston(9) read this article so that you don’t have to!

Firstly, relax! It is not difficult to hang up a hammock. If you have a decent hammock and use suspension equipment which is suitable for your chosen location, then it will be quick and easy to make yourself a bed in the sky.

The basic principles of hanging a hammock are as follows:

  1. You need two supports strong enough to carry all the people in the hammock.
    • The main tree trunk of a living tree is almost always strong enough. Branches are more risky. I would always go for the main trunk unless it is a really substantial tree.
    • If it is supporting a house, then it is probably strong enough. You can attach hammocks to interior walls or to the support for a pergola. The wall of a standard British garden shed will probably not be good enough. Fence posts are risky. You will know if it is strong enough. 
    • Street furniture is usually designed to withstand plenty of abuse. We have hung hammocks from posts at train stations, public railings and sign posts before.
    • The tow-bar or roof rack or your vehicle can make a useful second post. The tow-bar is often low to the ground, so that will usually only work if the topography is correct. Roof racks and roof bars should be carefully assessed on an individual basis.
    • It is possible to rig up a bi-pod with a guy rope pegged into the ground for one end of the hammock. This would be most suitable for a 1 person hammock, as it is not the strongest solution, but it does solve the ‘two-tree problem’.
  2. You need something tall enough to hang it from at a comfortable height.
    • If you look at all the photos of people laying in hammocks when they are between trees, you will see that the rope is at about 30-45 degrees. So depending on the hanging distance , extend that line upwards and outwards to your hanging point. I usually find myself attaching my ropes to a tree at about head height.
    • When we set up the hammock for children, we usually have it as low to the ground as possible. That means that when they fall out, nobody gets hurt. So you can take the hanging height into consideration. Remember that a brand new hammock will stretch a little on it’s first few uses, so you will want to leave some room for adjustment. It will also hang lower to the ground with more people or heavier people in it.
  3. You need to fix it to your supports in such a way that the attachment gets stronger when there is more weight in the hammock, but can be easily undone when the weight is removed.
    • An example of this would be hanging the hammock from simple S-hooks. It is very easy to remove the hammock from the hooks when it is empty, but when you have some weight in the hammock it is perfectly secure. There is no need for carabiners until you plan to be jumping around in the hammock. Even in that case it is hard to dislodge a hammock from s-hooks.
    • When you wrap a rope around a tree, getting in the hammock will pull it tighter and hold it in place. This principle works on even the smoothest trees. This means that if you simply wrap a rope twice around a tree trunk so that it overlaps itself and then attach one end to itself and the other end to the hammock, it will be stronger the more weight is in the hammock. I hope that was explained clearly.
    • You should stick to simple knots that are easy to undo. There is nothing less relaxing than having to spend an hour trying to untie a rope from a tree. Most hammock ropes are polyester which is strong, but it is also slippery enough that it is easier to untie knots. Tree straps with s-hooks make it easy to clip on to itself, so it is very easy to untie again once the weight is removed.
  4. Your hanging points should be a good distance apart. The range is quite big, There is a clear limit when the supporting objects are too close together. This is roughly 90% of the overall length of the hammock.

    For hanging points which are further apart, the limit is more down to personal preference. I would be quite happy with a hanging distance of about ten meters. You get a nice slow swing with a longer hanging distance. However, you need more rope and you have to attach the rope quite a lot higher.
  5. You need a hammock you can trust not to break.
Fix the hammock to any wall
Fix your hammock to a wall

Fixed vs Temporary Fixings

Are you planning to keep your hammock in one place, or even move it between two or three regular places? Maybe you want your hammock at one end of your deck or terrace in the morning and at the other end in the evening. If that is the case then I would suggest setting up fixings at each location. It is much better to simply unclip your hammock from one place and clip it on to another one without having to check and adjust a rope each time. In my ideal world, I would have wall hooks attached all over the place at just the right height and spacing.

If you are planning to put your hammock in it’s handy carry bag and take it off to the forest or beach then you will find ropes a much better solution. You could start screwing hooks into every tree you use so that they are there for future visitors. Most healthy trees will not be damaged by this, especially if you use stainless steel or other rust proof fixings. Most fixings are in this category. However you are probably looking to relax in your hammock rather than setting out on a minor DIY task.

Vivere Single Hook Set
This is an S-Hook

S-Hooks Vs Carabiners

Advantages of S-Hooks

  • Quick and easy to hang and remove your hammock.
  • Cheaper
  • Easy to adjust

Advantages of Carabiners

  • Feels very secure.
  • Is more secure, especially if children are playing in the hammock.
  • You could attach two things pulling in different directions without added risk.

Moving on from the mechanics of hanging your hammock, some things to consider when aiming for ultimate relaxation and comfort in your hammock are:

  1. It is more comfortable to have a hammock that is well balanced. The most balanced hammocks are the ones that self adjust. Does the hammock have strings which can slide through the loops at the end of the hammock ?

    The Colombian hammocks have an open loop design, which many people say  enhances balance compared to the closed loop design. In my opinion, the difference is very small. But they do look nicer and are easier to hang.

    ‘Cadejos’ are continuations of the main hammock bed fabric which are woven into plaits. Logically this would spread the weight perfectly and make the hammock more comfortable. I think the difference is small, but every detail is worth considering.

  2. It is worth thinking about the comfort of the fabric against your skin. Cotton feels nice. Polycotton, which is 70% polyester and 30% cotton feels very similar, but are more durable and weatherproof. Nylon doesn’t feel quite as comfortable against the skin, but the travel hammocks pack up really small and are really strong, so it is a trade off.

  3. Durability. A hammock kept indoors will last for as long as any other furniture. If it is going to be left outside to the elements, then it should be allowed to dry when it gets wet, and man made fibres like polyester or polypropylene will last longer than cotton.

  4. Portability: How small does your hammock pack up? Will you be moving it often ? The travel hammocks are the most portable, but a single cotton hammock only weighs just over a kilo and takes up about the same space as a wooly jumper in your luggage.
Elegance Double Hammock - Ecru
The Elegance is a beautiful HAMACA famiily hammock

Other factors to consider. Although this guide is more about hanging your hammock, so this is just a quick list.

  1. Price: You don’t have to pay a fortune for a good hammock, but really cheap ones are not the best value.
  2. Design: It feels better to lay in a beautiful hammock.
  3. Fair Trade: No need to feel guilty.
  4. Environmental concerns: From an environmentalists  perspective, for cotton hammocks , recycled cotton is the best, followed by organic cotton, followed by regular cotton.
  5. Opportunity cost: You could buy some Bitcoin instead.

I hope you found this guide useful. I intended to lay out the basic principles. It is not rocket science and as long as you check and test your hammock before diving in, then it should all be fine. Good luck and happy relaxation.

Hammock Heaven - Only the best Hammocks
Hammock Heaven – Only the best Hammocks

You can see our range of hammocks here, and you can see our extensive range of fixings and accessories here. We offer free shipping on most orders and you are welcome to call or email us with any questions. Hammock Heaven has been online since 2004, so we have learnt a thing or two about hammocks in the last 15 years!

This video is a reading of this article with a selection
of hammocks and fixings from our range.

Why Buy A Double Hammock over a Single Hammock ?

Nirvana Double Hammock - Amethyst

Here are some reasons, but please wait for next weeks blog post which will argue the opposite case! Plus look out for ‘Why buy a Family Hammock over a Double Hammock‘ coming soon!

A double hammock is one that is big enough for two adults to relax in comfort.

I would say the minimum width of fabric for a traditional hammock to be counted as a double hammock is 150cm. For a hammock with spreader bars which will hold the fabric open, i would say 130cm would be wide enough.

For the traditional cotton hammock, 150cm+ allows two people to lay side by side.

You can also fit two adults in a single hammock, but in a double hammock you can even create your own area with a soft ridge in between. You can easily lay top and tail like this, almost like having two hammocks.

So, the first reason to buy a double hammock is that it is big enough for two people.

Double Hammocks Allow Room For Kids

You don’t have to always have two people in the hammock of course. We have 3 boys. My youngest is still a baby, but I can hang with my older two in the hammock. I guess that technically makes it a triple hammock, but there is plenty of room while my boys are still under 130cm tall. It’s a fun place to relax and chat or read with our children.

Cayo Double Hammock - Lime

A double hammock is also better than a single hammock if you intend to use it mainly for one person. More width and a bit more length, means you have more positions in which you can lay.

Lay And Sit Across A Hammock

You can lay directly across the hammock if you have your legs bent. It makes a very comfortable half sitting position, from which you can see your surroundings.

If you prefer to lay as flat as possible, then laying diagonally in a 160cm wide cotton hammock will give you a flatter laying suface than you would get in a 120-140cm wide single hammock. It is just more comfortable.

Use A Hammock As A Sun Shade

If you have taken your hammock to a nice sunny area, then the extra fabric of a double hammock allows you to arrange it in such a way, that part of the hammock can shade your head. This is easy and comfortable.

Mammoth XXL Family Hammock - Azureus
Hammock as a sun shade

It is easy to carry your hammock where you go because our Hamaca hammocks come complete with a nice matching shoulder bag, which is also big enough to fit a drink ,a book, and some tree bands along side your hammock. The bag is comfortable and the hammock is not heavy. Or should I say that the hammock is comfortable and the bag is not heavy?

Cayo Double Hammock - Handy carry bag included
Handy and strong carry bag that comes for FREE with all Hamaca hammocks

One Disadvantage Of A Double Hammock

The only downside is that you can’t really claim there is not room for more people when you want it to yourself.

USE A HAMMOCK FOR STRESS RELIEF

Relaxing in a denim hammock

Allowing yourself time to relax in a hammock can be a nice way to decompress after a difficult day at the office. If the boss has been a bear or you’re facing a relentless deadline on a major project, there are no better avenues for chilling out than setting aside a little time to stretch out and relax in your hammock.

Simply close your eyes and think about the word “hammock.” What comes to mind when you envision the term? It’s different for everyone, but it may very likely include a secluded beach, with waves providing the soundtrack while you sip one of your favorite cool drinks. Or perhaps your hammock vision involves resting by a quiet mountain brook, with no humans within miles. Or maybe you think of your hammock as a haven of relaxation after taking care of the kids all day.

Regardless of the diverse setting your mind creates, the idea of intellectual and physical restoration always seems to accompany the mental picture. Resting in a hammock is a wonderful way for people to recover from the demands of today’s fast-paced lifestyle. What better way to deflect the stress that has accumulated during the day than by spending some quality time nestled in your hammock?

At HammockHeaven there are hammocks available that fit every lifestyle and personality. Traditionalists may prefer to channel their inner Gilligan and embrace the spreader-bar Rope or Quilted Hammock. Those who want more colour may prefer a Mayan or Colombian Hammock. Poolside Hammocks dry quickly and can be a decorative part of your pool décor. Campers, backpackers and outdoors enthusiasts may prefer one of the lightweight Camping Hammocks.

Regardless of your personal preference, a hammock offers an unmatched opportunity to shed the weight of the world from your shoulders. There’s a freedom of relaxation that comes when you’re suspended in mid-air. You suddenly become immune to the stress of the crazy, fast-paced lifestyle that society has managed to embrace.

So slow down and take a few minutes to restore your sanity. Slide into your hammock, close your eyes and take a few deep breaths. It won’t be long before you are deflecting the stress of the day and easing into a zone of mental refreshment.

Tents vs. Hammocks: How a Traditional Camper Took to Sleeping in Trees

Hamaca Hammocks

Hammock brand Kammok tried to sell me — a lifelong tent-user — on hanging versus traditional camping. So I went along with the brand for overnights in Texas heat and cool Colorado mountains to see how hammock camping stacks up.

Top image — Roo single hammock with Kuhli Weather Shelter;  Meyvn Creative

I have never been interested in hammock camping; It’s never seemed that comfortable. What about bugs, weather — and how do you move around? As a climbing guide certified by the American Mountain Guides Association, I’ve camped more times than I can count, in just about every condition. An ultralight one-person tent comes near the 1-pound mark, so I haven’t seen the need to hang in the breeze.

But Kammok, an Austin, Texas-based brand focused on all things hammock, is near my hometown. So this summer, we arranged a local camping trip to introduce me to sleeping slung, followed up by a kayak and camping outing near Gunnison, Colorado. I started as a nonbeliever, but now I see how hammock camping can add enjoyment to plenty of outdoor endeavors.

Here’s how I went from hammock curmudgeon to enthusiast — well, ally, at least.

5 Advantages of a Hammock on paper

Kammok lobbied me initially with a healthy list of hammock camping advantages. In general, the brand boiled hammock camping down to five primary benefits:

Set up and break down camp faster. There are no stakes, poles, or sleeping pads necessary — just a pair of tree straps and the hammock for mild, bugless conditions.

Travel lighter. Kammok claims a Roo Single $69 with a pair of 10-foot Python straps $29 weighs in at 1 pound, 2.2 ounces — together under $100. Expensive ultralight tents, like the Big Agnes Fly Creek HV1 Platinum, come in at 1 pound 7 ounces and run $500. Though the tent is slightly heavier, it includes bug and rain protection.

Sleep better. Kammok’s site touts a study that suggests the natural rocking motion of a hammock can elongate the non-REM portion of sleep.

Camp wherever you are. In addition to better sleep, hitting the proverbial hay is presumably less of a chore. No need to clear the ground of rocks or sticks, and mud is never an issue. You just need the appropriate trees.

Leave no trace. Hammocks never leave smashed-down foliage, and the Python straps spread the load across 1.5 inches of webbing to leave trees unscathed.

Some of these claims seem plausible, but I required convincing for others. A local camping trip and subsequent Colorado trip gave me the opportunity to give each reason a stamp of approval — or the thumbs down.

Texas Hammocking With Kammok Staff

Kammok decided on a car camping trip to Pedernales Falls State Park as my initial hammock camping experience. A typical Texas summer guaranteed high temperatures and humidity, a great test for what I considered the apparent venting advantage of hammocks.

Ease of Setup

Upon securing a campsite, two Kammok staffers let me venture off to set up a Roo Double $99 with Dragonfly Insect Net $79 by myself. I had previously set up a Kammok at my house, but I didn’t reference any resources. And even with the added net, common sense got the hammock up more quickly than any tent.

The setup is logical, intuitive, and doesn’t require knot tying. So yes, even in an uneducated, unassisted state, getting a hammock up and functional proved faster than a tent. That is, as long as live, suitable trees 12-15 feet apart are available. And with some pro tips from the Kammok designer, setting up became even faster.

Sleep Quality

One Kammok team member warned me my first night in a hammock might be restless. But I had zero issues falling asleep after setting my preferred hanging tension Kammok recommends starting with a 30-degree angle, which was easy with the 20 adjustment points on each Python strap and the hammock’s carabiners.

I am a side sleeper and have restless legs. The “hugging” effect of the hammock kept me still for the entire night — a rarity for me — without disrupting my slumber. I also slept on my back, as it was more comfortable than sleeping on my side. Lying on my stomach required much higher hammock tension and, in my opinion, wasn’t as comfortable as a tent floor.

Although I was in a “double” hammock, I think it would be difficult for two adults to sleep comfortably throughout the night due to transmitted movement and inability to avoid contact. I enjoyed having the extra space on the hammock as a solo camper, sprawling unimpeded. But for simple relaxation and lounging, the Roo Double was a comfortable and cozy affair for two adults.

Photo credit: Meyvn CreativeComfort and Strength

Kammok rates the Roo Double and each Python strap to 500 pounds, the Dyneema hammock slings to 22 kN, and each Kanga Claw carabiner to 23 kN 13 kN for the Roo Single. All of this quelled any fears I harbored of a sudden midsleep collapse. For safety and comfort, Kammok also recommends a maximum hanging height of 18 inches.

And with overnight temperatures in the 80s with relatively high humidity, the airiness under the hammock proved excellent at keeping me comfortable. Even the slightest breeze provided a cooling effect, and the 70-denier LunarWeave ripstop nylon DWR-treated offered much more breathability than coated tent fabric.

Overall, hammock camping proved pleasant, easy, and environmentally friendly in the humid, high-temperature Texas testing grounds. But I still needed to try it out for more rugged environs.

Kammok Camping in Colorado

Kammok and Oru Kayak put on a trip to Gunnison, Colorado, to test its techier offerings, and I was eager to escape to colder temperatures.

Photo credit: Meyvn CreativeKuhli Weather Shelter

Our first night found us on a forested mountainside. Trees were in abundance, and the night promised a dip in the mercury.

I set up a Roo Single, this time with a wind- and precipitation-proof Kuhli Weather Shelter $169 and 30-degree sleeping bag my own. What was previously an advantage in the heat of Texas became a disadvantage in the mountain cold. The hammock’s openness wasn’t as protective against harsher climes.

Firebelly Trail Quilt

Another cold-weather hammock camping issue was the added challenge of insulating against the cold air beneath. Theoretically, an insulating pad could work, but an underquilt, like the 30-degree down Kammok Firebelly Trail Quilt $279, is a more elegant, comfortable, and efficient solution. It’s expensive, however.

The quilt places the insulating layer underneath the hammock, eliminating loss of loft due to crushing from your body weight. The overnight temperatures dropped into the lower 40s, but I managed to stay warm by engaging the full mummy mode of my sleeping bag and slept well.

Sunda: The Hammock-Tent

The next day put us on the Gunnison River at Blue Mesa Reservoir. We paddled to a sandy beach that had a limited selection of trees. Here, I chose to sample the Sunda Tent Hammock $399, a unique, albeit complex, hammock-tent combination.

Because of its size and componentry, it was the only shelter we had to stow on the exterior of the kayak. Others’ hammocks were compact enough to stow inside the Oru foldable kayaks.

Photo credit: Meyvn Creative

The group congregated in a narrow grove of trees, everyone successfully and quickly finding workable anchors. Finding a suitable tent site in the shade on this beach would have proved difficult, as there wasn’t much flat ground near the trees.

I pitched the Sunda in the tent configuration in a separate area than most of the hammocks to secure a flat tent site. This exposed me to the early morning sun, but the Sunda proved breezy, so sleeping past dawn wasn’t an issue.

At 100 inches, the tent-hammock’s floor is much longer than a typical two-person tent. This leaves plenty of space above or below the sleeping bags for gear and pets within its spacious 34.7 square feet.

Although I didn’t get to try the Sunda as a hammock, a Kammok staffer demonstrated this mode. It was a bit complicated to set up but yielded a hammock with a built-in bug net and fly.

The Sunda left a visible footprint in the sand. But all the hammocks indeed left no trace: No telltale signs of a tent floor, only footprints, and trees were left unharmed.

Kammok Hammock: The Verdict

I came into these Kammok-sponsored outings as an experienced outdoor adventurer that wasn’t impressed with or overly interested in hammock camping. I figured it would take a lot to sway me into believing the advantages could overcome the disadvantages. Or that the hammock camping movement was nothing other than a hipster-driven, backyard-oriented flavor of the month. No offense.

At the outset, Kammok claimed five hammock advantages over traditional tent camping. I tested each of the brand’s claims thoroughly during my outings with the company.

Set up and break down camp faster. I now agree that camping hammocks can be quicker to set up and break down.

Travel lighter. This is possible in mild conditions. A Roo Single and a pair of Python 10-foot straps weight just over 1pound — compact and relatively inexpensive under $100 compared to ultralight one-person tents $500+.

But the hammock package swells in weight, size, and cost if a bug net and tarp are required. Adding Kammok’s accessories increased the claimed weight to 3 pounds, with a total price of $346, negating both weight and cost advantages. And that’s without the underquilt.

Sleep better. Sleep is so subjective. I did sleep better and more still in warmer conditions than I typically do in a tent. But this had nothing to do with the rocking motion, as the brand claimed. Rather, the “hugging” of the hammock subdued my restless legs.

I also believe that temperatures lower than the 40s Fahrenheit require an underquilt, which adds expense and weight. And should storms brew, a tarp — Kammok’s or third-party — is a must to ensure sound sleep. Finally, stomach sleepers may have issues with creating enough tension to avoid back hyperextension.

Camp wherever you are. This is true if there are trees. And that can be a big “if.” Desert dwellers need not apply.

Leave no trace. I completely agree. As noted above, all the hammock options left fewer visible signs of human presence than a tent does.

Hammock Camping Is Fun

One thing Kammok failed to list as a primary advantage of hammock camping is the added fun factor. The novelty and unique feel of sleeping in a hammock added an irrepressible grin to my outings. And having one up for relaxing during the daytime, in favorable conditions, is worlds nicer and more social than crawling into a tent.

For this tester, the bottom line is that hammock camping can add comfort and fun to both front-country and backcountry adventures, as long as 1 the conditions remain mild and 2 appropriate trees are available.

And for me, hammocks will also get a favorable nod when the temperatures are high, as they allow more breathability than a tent. Perhaps most importantly, as a dad, I will bring a hammock or three along on every family car camping trip. No matter where we sleep, having hammocks hanging around invites relaxing — a primary goal of any getaway.

By Seiji Ishii Seiji Ishii is an adventure journalist that blurs the lines between work and play, writing about his climbing, two-wheeled and on-foot adventures, and the gear involved. He is also an AMGA Certified Single Pitch Instructor and an ACSM certified personal trainer, specializing in climbers and motocrosssupercross athletes. He lives in the woods with his wife, daughter, and a small herd of pets in Wimberley, Texas.